Fresh prawns

shell-on-prawns

A prawn by any other name, would taste as sweet

A poetic introduction to the prawn, courtesy of our 400 year old Shakespeare and his rose! Do you get confused between a shrimp, prawn, scampi and langoustine.  Is it all in the name and the size? Yes and no.

 Langoustine (also known as Scampi tails and Dublin Bay prawns or Norwegian lobster), we catch a lot. So, to clarify, scampi comes from langoustine and Dublin Bay Prawns. To confuse things further, in the USA, prawns are called shrimp,  but in the UK we see shrimp as small crustacean caught off Morecambe Bay and at Silloth.shelled-prawns

We catch ‘langoustine prawns’, and  we do sell loads of other prawns in the shop and on markets:  our small cooked, shell on prawns were caught in the North East and West Atlantic, whilst our cooked shelled prawns come from Greenland or the Gulf of St Laurence in Canada.

We grade all langoustine, small ones go as tails, and anything over a 36 ‘count’ are kept whole. The count is quite literally that – a count of how many there are to the kilogramme. The smaller the count, the bigger the langoustine/prawn.

Around 80% of the fish caught in our local waters are langoustine. Did you know, the season usually co-incides with the Isle of Man TT races at the end of May. With the bad winter and stormy weather, it will be interesting to see if there’s an abundance at the start of June.

Gin and Tonic Prawns – try something quirky with a great local gin.King Prawn

Marinade raw prawns in a double shot of gin, along with a squeeze of lime juice, and a dash of sweet chilli sauce for 2 hours. When ready to cook, mix 150g self-raising flour with a pinch of salt and sugar. Add 2 double shots of gin and 3 fl oz. tonic.  Mix until a thick batter then add prawns. Heat vegetable oil in a deep pan until very hot, then carefully drop the coated prawns in one by one.  Cook til crispy then serve with sugar snap peas, and some sweet chilli dipping sauce. (Aimee Houghton, www.Passthegin.co.uk )

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